COVID-19 Vaccine

On January 5, 2021, the State of New Hampshire published its COVID-19 vaccination allocation plan.

Based on the timeline, we anticipate receiving vaccine doses for patients between February and March.

Published on January 07, 2021

COVID-19 Vaccine & Vaccination

Wondering When You Can Get A COVID-19 Vaccine?

The State of New Hampshire's COVID-19 vaccination allocation plan outlines the criteria for each phase of the rollout.

Read the Plan

On January 5, 2021, the State of New Hampshire published its COVID-19 vaccination allocation plan that outlines the time line for each phase of the plan.

Based on the timeline, we anticipate receiving vaccine doses for patients between February and March, although this time frame may change.

These doses will be administered to patients of our primary care practices based on criteria set forth in Phase 1b of the State's plan.

Currently, our practices do not have doses of COVID-19 vaccine to administer to patients and are not scheduling vaccine appointments or maintaining a waitlist.

As plans for the distribution of the vaccine proceed, more information will be published on this page, including when and how to schedule a vaccination appointment.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

For answers to commonly asked questions about COVID-19 vaccine and vaccination check out our FAQ. If you have a question that's not answered in the FAQ, let us know. Your feedback will help us add more questions and answers that best address what patients, visitors and community members want to know.

What are the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines?

The vaccines are unapproved mRNA vaccines that may prevent COVID-19. There is no FDA-approved vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines to prevent COVID-19 under an EUA.

Who is eligible for the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines?

The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Pfizer vaccine in individuals 16 years of age and older under an EUA.

The FDA has authorized the emergency use of the Moderna vaccine in individuals 18 years of age and older under an EUA.

It is recommended that women who are pregnant or breastfeeding speak with their providers. Individuals who have had severe allergic reactions after a previous dose of a COVID-19 vaccine or had several allergic reactions to any other vaccines should not receive a COVID-19 vaccine.

Are the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines live vaccines?

No, the vaccines do not contain any live virus.

Will vaccination prevent me from getting COVID-19?

The vaccine may prevent you from getting COVID-19. There is no U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

How are the Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines administered?

The Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine is administered as a 2-dose series, 3 weeks apart, into the muscle of the upper arm.

The Moderna COVID-19 vaccine is administered as a 2-dose series, 1 month apart, into the muscle.

How long will the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines be effective?

The duration of protection against COVID-19 is currently unknown.

What are the commonly reported side effects of the Pfizer vaccine?

  • Injection site pain
  • Injection site swelling
  • Injection site redness
  • Tiredness
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Chills
  • Joint pain
  • Fever
  • Nausea
  • Feeling unwell
  • Swollen lymph nodes

What are the commonly reported side effects of the Moderna vaccine?

  • Injection site pain
  • Injection site tenderness
  • Injection site hardness and redness
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Muscle pain
  • Joint pain
  • Chills
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fever

I’ve already had COVID-19, do I need a vaccine?

The CDC states that it cannot comment on whether people who had COVID-19 should get a COVID-19 vaccine. There is not enough information currently available to say if or for how long after infection someone is protected from getting COVID-19 again.

When can I get a vaccine?

We're following the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) COVID-19 Vaccination Program guidelines as well as the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services COVID-19 Vaccination allocation plan.

Because the current supply of COVID-19 vaccine in the United States is limited, the federal and state guidelines recommend that initial supplies of COVID-19 vaccine be rolled out in phases to various populations, starting with populations deemed critical to receive the vaccine. (i.e., at-risk healthcare workers, older adults in residential care settings and first responders) Learn more about NH's COVID-19 vaccination allocation guidelines for those populations identified to receive the vaccine in the first phases of vaccine distribution.

Once the vaccine is widely available, the plan is to have several thousand vaccination providers offering COVID-19 vaccines in doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers.

Can I schedule a vaccine appointment?

Currently, our primary care practices are NOT scheduling vaccine appointments. As our planning proceeds, we will update our Web site with information on how to schedule a vaccine appointment.

On January 5, 2020, the State of New Hampshire published its COVID-19 vaccination allocation plan. The plan outlines the timeline for each phase of the vaccination rollout and defines criteria for each phase. View the State's plan.

  • Phase 1a & 1b - December thru March;
  • Phase 2a & 2b - March to May;
  • Phase 3a & 3b - May and beyond.

How much does a vaccine cost and is it covered by health insurance?

At this time, Concord Hospital is receiving the COVID-19 vaccine for free through the federal government. Because we're receiving the vaccine for free, there is no charge for the vaccine itself.

There is an administration fee of $22 per dose* that will be covered in full by your insurance carrier or the federal government if you do not have insurance.

* The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines require two doses.